Category: "R:WM Dev Blog"

Building/Builder Menu Updated

Building/Builder Menu Updated
Building/Builder Menu Updated
Building/Builder Menu Updated
Building/Builder Menu Updated
Building/Builder Menu Updated

The current push is to get the single player running by mid-March for the GDC/Game Conection demo.  So the idea is to start from the beginning of the player's journey and make sure all the pieces are in place to go all the way through the main game loop.  So that journey of course, starts on the planet and starting to build a city.  So the start of that is to order the builder bot to build a building.  While this worked before, it still was tied to the old system and was so old it didn't take into account if the player actually had the building itself researched or not.  Not to mention a lot of other problems.  So the solve was to rebuild the menu display system in the "new way."  While the initial menu is still the old system, that seems to be more stable.  As you can see by the screen capture progression, building under the new system works fine.

Another issue has been addressed in the load/save/network system involving the terrain itself.  The terrain is randomized each run of the game.  Now it is saved to a file and loaded from there so the terrain is now locked in place.  This will eventually allow for more hand crafted "random" terrain that should look far better.

Please check out our YouTube Channel, discord, and Twitter.  

UI/UX Artist: Further Refinements to the Ledger

Hello all. This is your UI/UX designer Paul here. For this week I have the newest, most zeroed-in "look" of the Asset Screen!

UI/UX Artist: Further Refinements to the Ledger

My last post showed the experimentation phase. Now the style is coming together. To make each bar holding the player's assets pop and self-distinguish, a gradient matching each bar's color scheme was devised.

UI/UX Artist: Further Refinements to the Ledger


A new "scan line" background was made for the actual fill of the Asset Screen's bars. The image above shows how it was made and how each step builds off the last one. A flat high-resolution backdrop of black and gray lines creates the "digital screen" look (bottom row.) Next, a white gradient overlaying that creates the gradual fade going out to the edges (middle row.) This white gradient is a separate object and thus its color and opacity (which here translates to brightness) can be readjusted as needed. Lastly a colored rectangle overlaying everything else gives customizeable color to that now gradiented screen (top row.) In this case, the blue bar fill is being applied.

UI/UX Artist: Further Refinements to the Ledger

The gradient that makes the outline and the composited scan line piece are placed into a single artboard. With the customizeable elements on top, both the outline and the screen can be colorized in a few clicks. This saves time and allows for non-destructive edits of the texture files.

UI/UX Artist: Further Refinements to the Ledger

Here is how it all comes together. The circles adjacent to the bars contain samples of the gradient and the fill of the outline and the body. Those can be copied and pasted onto the side-by-side image from before and just like that they are ready to be exported out to the 3D software application for UV mapping. Further touch ups will be needed as some bars will be taller than others, hence the need to have an "ez-export" project file to churn out updated texture maps as needed.

Different Music for Different Things

Instead of having a soundtrack that runs in the background throughout the entire game, we have been experimenting with music for different kinds of activity, like combat music, peaceful music, and menu music. Here is a look at one of the different menu tracks! I was experimenting with using vocoders on instruments (rather than on voices), and this is what I came up with. 

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Creating Controls

Creating Controls

Every video game needs controls: "OK" or "Cancel" buttons, dropdown or popup menus for selecting from a list of options, scroll bars, and so forth. In the image above we can see a popup menu in action, allowing us to select a rank for one of our AIs. Since we're using a completely custom game engine, all of our controls need to be created from scratch. Fortunately, our most clever programmers (Hi, Arthur!) built us a tool to make this as easy as drawing shapes on the screen.

Creating Controls

The screenshot above is our tool, ScreenMaker, in action. We draw each control as simple shapes, with or without attached images, that can be connected to one another to form a complete control, and then imported right into the game. Here we have our popup menu, a gauge control that we're using as a scroll bar, and the newest asset screen control, a qty selector for when we want to give some amount of a resource to a teammate or AI.

Below, we can see a gauge scroll bar in action.

Creating Controls

Banner art

Banner art
Banner art

Here are 2 images of the banner you can see in the future at shows we attend. 

UI/UX Artist: Asset Screen Update!

UI/UX Artist: Asset Screen Update!

Hi everyone! This is your UI/UX Artist Paul. It's been a while since I posted, so without further ado, here's the update! 

As mdcode, one of our programmers, has introduced, the Asset Screen is the digital ledger where all of the player's assets from personnel to ships to cities are displayed with contextual information regarding quantity and status. As more and more of the in-game screens are breaking the surface of functionality, I've been working on giving them a fresh new face that is both loyal to the style of the game, pleasing to the eye without being distracting, and also functional. As is always the case in graphic design, this meant doing more with less, and in a densely-packed environment like the Asset Screen, this was particularly true. 

The first thing I tackled was the issue of the bars that text is displayed on. As a kind of business ledger, this screen mostly consists of wide swathes of narrow horizontal space that serve no other purpose than to contain text. That doesn't leave a lot of room for drastic design changes. In this case, cutting corners wasn't a form of laziness. Truncated edges proved to be both a subtle aesthetic touch and also a practical visual aid, making it easier to "hook" the eye onto the start of a bar and thus distinguish the layers more readily.

UI/UX Artist: Asset Screen Update!

To better distinguish the different bars (which hold different information) color coding was implemented and then combined with texture overlays. Several experimental models were created to test how far a feel could go before it began to clash with the overall vibe of the game itself. The main point is to allow players to know what they are looking at in as little time as possible.

 UI/UX Artist: Asset Screen Update!

In order to scale with high fidelity, these bars exist as three-dimensional polygons in space, and as such will have textures applied to them. This adds complexity but also allows more freedom in how colors and other effects are handled. One nifty trick is the fact that in 3D, a single solid piece of geometry can have its corresponding texture map moved independently. Here's how this was applied to the outline of the bar seen at the top of this post.

UI/UX Artist: Asset Screen Update!

The texture image is split in halves: one containing the gradient that will be mapped to the outline, and another containing the textured background that will "fill" the space of the bar. A false-color mockup of the bar is overlaid here in bright purple to show how this geometry will be align with respect to the image.

UI/UX Artist: Asset Screen Update!

With that done, the two separate texture look like this. Note that mockups from before were vertical whereas these are horizontal. This is an example of how the "uv islands" of a polygon object can be moved and rotated independently from how the actual object will appear when rendered.

UI/UX Artist: Asset Screen Update!

The previous image illustrated the fact that the outline and the fill can be handled independently. But they are still actually joined parts of the same single-piece 3D mesh. It is only how portions of that mesh are remapped to the texture that is separate. This is how the bar will look in-game. The whole point of doing this way is that now we can apply shader effects and other graphical changes to one part without it affecting the other. Maybe the outline will glow? Maybe the gradient on the outline will strobe? Maybe the fill can have different color overlays or filters applied? We can play around with it now and see what works!

Cleaning up the Shipbuilder

Cleaning up the Shipbuilder
Cleaning up the Shipbuilder
Cleaning up the Shipbuilder
Cleaning up the Shipbuilder

While not finished being cleaned up, the shipbuilder, one of the foundational pieces of the game has gotten the "screen maker" overhaul.  Which means the interface is far far easier to create and make alterations than before, which was by hand.  While the UI/UX interfaces originally were all hard coded, the move to a script based creation mechanism happened a long while ago.  While this opened up a lot of possiblities for testing new concepts and ease of switching out graphics, all the placements of UI elements were still done by fiddling with the numbers directly in the scripts, rather than in the code itself.  So while switching a filename for a graphic became far easier for those that weren't compiling the source code, the hand done numbers were very daunting.  Enter the "ScreenMaker" utility that I created back in June of last year, that I created to make the multiplayer screens quickly.  That in itself was a game changer for the game, not that it didn't need a bunch of upgrades, but it worked well enough for the multiplayer screens.  The ShipBuilder was a whole different level of complexity.  While the ShipBuilder had been rewritten for the newer interfaces, it wasn't screenmaker compatible.  Mostly because it was too complex.

That has now changed.  ScreenMaker has been greatly upgraded, and with it, shipbuilder is now fully functional (with some minor cosmetic rewiring left to do) via ScreenMaker.  I have included both the old screen shots and the new ones.  The newer ones are being shown first, so the search engines find those rather than the nastier ones.  Look at the older screen shots, you can see what people had to put up with until now.  ;)  The newer ones even have pop up tool tips to tell you what they are and what to do with the controls. :)  This makes it far easier for people to use.  Further updates to this text is coming.

Also, another major breakthrough to the UI/UX that screenmaker allows is popup overlays. This is already being implemented on the Asset screen and also on the Multiplayer Lobby screen.  More on that in the coming weeks.

Please check out the next livestream on Youtube and subscribe (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXex4ualUNFdSVHJhtxDsWg) and follow us on twitter at http://twitter.com/@LBPSInc !

 

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Warmaster Line Up

Warmaster Line Up

Here are the current actoins of The Warmaster with the medals. Created in Clip Studio

The Factory Screen - Can't Smite Your Enemies Without Ships

The Factory Screen - Can't Smite Your Enemies Without Ships

It's true, you can't smite your enemies without ships. To build ships in Rank: WarMaster, you'll need some factories, and to access your factories, you'll need the factory screen.

The Factory Screen - Can't Smite Your Enemies Without Ships

The factory screen will let you select factories by planet and installation and build ships by simply dragging and dropping a ship design into your queue. You'll be able to view the specs of any of the ships you've designed, as well as jump directly to the Ship Builder to modify them. You'll be able to reorder your queues just by clicking and dragging items around, and drag and drop ships between queues to reprioritize what each factory is building.

We've begun live-streaming our multiplayer tests; check them and more out at our Youtube channel!

Changing Keys

Modulation (changing the key of a song, or changing where the "home" note is) is a technique used in many, many forms of music. Some musicals go up a half-step every 8 bars, some pieces have the same harmony for hours on end. The particular kind of modulation that I did in this next clip is not very common: down a half step. I'm not sure why, but it came to me pretty naturally in this song. Here are two clips to compare: one from the beginning of the track, so you can hear what key I started in, and the second with the climax and part of the outro of the song, to hear where I went. Enjoy! (and of course, there are more French horns in this clip!)

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